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For Parents / Educators

1997-present

"AALBC.com is the oldest, largest, and most frequently visited web site dedicated to books by, or about, people of African descent. Started in 1997, AALBC.com is a widely recognized source of information about Black authors." It's mission: To celebrate Black culture through literature and literary nonfiction to readers of all backgrounds and ages; and advocate for independent media.

by Debbie Reese
2006-present

In the words of blog author and educator Debbie Reese, "... A primary purpose of American Indians in Children's Literature (AICL) is to help you know who we are. Knowing who we are can help you understand why we strenuously object to being misrepresented. Though I am certain that no author ever sets out to deliberately misrepresent who we are in his or her writing, it happens over and over again. Information is the only way to counter those misrepresentations. On American Indians in Children's Literature, I publish analyses of children's books, lesson plans, films, and other items related to the topic of American Indians and/or how we this topic is taught in school."

Brown Bookshelf logo
Don Tate, Kelly Starling Lyons, Tameka Fryer Brown, Olugbemisola Rhuday-Perkovich, Gwendolyn Hooks, Crystal Allen, Varian Johnson, Tracey Baptiste, Jerry Craft, and Paula Chase-Hyman
2007-present

The Brown Bookshelf is designed to push awareness of the myriad of African American voices writing for young readers. Their flagship initiative is 28 Days Later, a month-long showcase of the best in Picture Books, Middle Grade and Young Adult novels written and illustrated by African Americans.

Cover of Crossing Over to Canaan: T
by Gloria Ladson-Billings
0787950017
2001

Gloria Ladson-Billings provides a perceptive and interesting account of what is needed to prepare novice teachers to be successful with all students in our multicultural society. This book is must reading for all those entering the profession of teaching today and for those who prepare them for this important work."
--Ken Zeichner, associate dean and professor of curriculum and instruction, School of Education, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Cover of A Different Mirror for You
by Rebecca Stefoff and Ronald T. Takaki
1609804848
2012

A Different Mirror for Young People brings ethnic history alive through primary sources, the words of people, including teenagers, who recorded their experiences in letters, diaries, and poems.

EmbraceRace: Raising a Brave Generation
Melissa Giraud and Andrew Grant Thomas, CoFounders
2016-present

EmbraceRace is a multiracial community of parents, teachers, experts, and other caring adults who support each other to meet the challenges that race poses to our children, families, and communities.

Cover of For White Folks Who Teach
by Christopher Emdin
9780807006405
2016

Merging real stories with theory, research, and practice, a prominent scholar offers a new approach to teaching and learning for every stakeholder in urban education. Drawing on his own experience of feeling undervalued and invisible in science classrooms as a young man of color, Christopher Emdin offers a new lens on and approach to teaching in urban schools.

Cover of Fred Korematsu Speaks Up
by Laura Atkins & Stan Yogi
9781597143684
2016

Fred Korematsu liked listening to music on the radio, playing tennis, and hanging around with his friends--just like lots of other Americans. But everything changed when the United States went to war with Japan in 1941 and the government forced all people of Japanese ancestry to leave their homes on the West Coast and move to distant prison camps. This included Fred, whose parents had immigrated to the United States from Japan many years before. But Fred refused to go. He knew that what the government was doing was unfair. And when he got put in jail for resisting, he knew he couldn't give up. Inspired by the award-winning book for adults Wherever There's a Fight, the Fighting for Justice series introduces young readers to real-life heroes and heroines of social progress. The story of Fred Korematsu's fight against discrimination explores the life of one courageous person who made the United States a fairer place for all Americans, and it encourages all of us to speak up for justice.

Cover of I'm New Here
by Anne Sibley O'Brien
9781580896122
2015

Three students are immigrants from Guatemala, Korea, and Somalia and have trouble speaking, writing, and sharing ideas in English in their new American elementary school. Through self-determination and with encouragement from their peers and teachers, the students learn to feel confident and comfortable in their new school without losing a sense of their home country, language, and identity.

Cover of Indian Nations of Wisconsi
by Patty Loew
9780870205033
2013

From origin stories to contemporary struggles over treaty rights and sovereignty issues, Indian Nations of Wisconsin: Histories of Endurance and Renewal explores Wisconsin’s rich Native tradition. Each chapter is a compact tribal history of one of the state’s Indian nations—Ojibwe, Potawatomi, Oneida, Menominee, Mohican and Brothertown, and Ho-Chunk—and the book relies on the historical perspectives of Native people.

Jane Addams logo
Jane Addams Peace Association
yearly

The Jane Addams Children's Book Awards are given annually to the children's books published the preceding year that effectively promote the cause of peace, social justice, world community, and the equality of the sexes and all races as well as meeting conventional standards for excellence.

Cover of Let's Talk About Race
by Julius Lester and Karen Barbour
0060285966
2005

 

Julius Lester says, "I write because our lives are stories. If enough of those stories are told, then perhaps we will begin to see that our lives are the same story. The differences are merely in the details." Now Mr. Lester shares his own story as he explores what makes each of us special. Karen Barbour's dramatic, vibrant paintings speak to the heart of Lester's unique vision, truly a celebration of all of us.

 

Cover of My Name is Yoon
by Helen Recorvits and Gabi Swiatkowska
0374351147
2003

Disliking her name as written in English, Korean-born Yoon, or "shining wisdom," refers to herself as "cat," "bird," and "cupcake," as a way to feel more comfortable in her new school and new country.

Cover of Nurtureshock: New Thinking
by Po Bronson and Ashley Merryman
9780446504126
2009

When is it too soon - or too late - to teach a child about race? Children in diverse schools are less likely to have a cross-racial friendship, not more - so is school diversity backfiring? With impeccable storytelling and razor-sharp analysis, the authors demonstrate that many of modern society's strategies for nurturing children are in fact backfiring--because key twists in the science have been overlooked.

by Kristen Howertow, The Huffington Post
2013

Blogger Kristen Howerton (Rage Against the Minivan) offers some practical suggestions how to develop an environment where diversity is valued.  

Cover of Separate Is Never Equal:
by Duncan Tonatiuh
9781419710544
2014

Almost 10 years before Brown vs. Board of Education , Sylvia Mendez and her parents helped end school segregation in California. An American citizen of Mexican and Puerto Rican heritage who spoke and wrote perfect English, Mendez was denied enrollment to a "Whites only" school. Her parents took action by organizing the Hispanic community and filing a lawsuit in federal district court. Their success eventually brought an end to the era of segregated education in California.

Teaching for Change logo
Teaching for Change
1989-present

At Teaching for Change, we are proud of our carefully selected booklists that highlight titles by and about people of color as well as social justice themes. Teaching for Change is proud to offer a diverse selection of titles that encourage children and adults to question, challenge, and re-think the world beyond the headlines.

Teaching Tolerance logo
a project of the Southern Poverty Law Center
1991-present

Teaching Tolerance provides free resources to educators—teachers, administrators, counselors and other practitioners—who work with children from kindergarten through high school.

We Are Kid Lit Collective
Thaddeus Andracki, Edith Campbell, Sarah Park Dahlen, Sujei Lugo, Lyn Miller-Lachmann, Nathalie Mvondo, Debbie Reese, Ed Spicer, The We Are Kidlit Collective
2015-present

"Books we recommend are ones written or illustrated by Native Americans or writers/illustrators of color that have withstood a critical review. We want readers to become familiar with the names on the list and their creative work and to enjoy the stories they tell and the people they represent.  We are proud to share our list." (Formerly known as the We're the People Summer Booklist)

"The We Are Kidlit Collective works to create materials and opportunities to recognize the humanity of Indigenous and People of Color (IPOC) in youth literature. Our work is premised upon the principles of social justice, equity, and inclusion and centers IPOC voices in children’s literature in order to identify, challenge and dismantle white supremacy and both internalized and systematic racism.  Our intended audience includes educators, librarians, caregivers and young people. We look for ways to improve the literacies of IPOC children, promote books written by and about IPOC, and to encourage gatekeepers to bring a lens of critical literacy to their work."

Cover of We Rise, We Resist, We Rai
Cheryl Willis Hudson, Wade Hudson, Ashley Bryan
9780525580423
2018

What do we tell our children when the world seems bleak, and prejudice and racism run rampant? With 96 lavishly designed pages of original art and prose, fifty diverse creators lend voice to young activists.

Cover of We Shall Overcome: A Song
by Stuart Stotts, illustrated by Terrance Cummings
0547182104
2010

In clear, accessible language Stuart Stotts explores the roots of the tune and the lyrics in traditional African music and Christian hymns. He demonstrates the key role “We Shall Overcome” played in the civil rights, labor, and anti-war movements in America. And he traces the song’s transformation into an international anthem

Cover of Whistling Vivaldi: and Oth
by Claude Steele
9780393062496
2010

In this work, the author, a social psychologist, addresses one of the most perplexing social issues of our time: the trend of minority underperformance in higher education.  Here he presents an insider's look at his research and details his groundbreaking findings on stereotypes and identity, findings that will deeply alter the way we think about ourselves, our abilities, and our relationships with each other. Through dramatic personal stories, he shares the researcher's experience of peering beneath the surface of our ordinary social lives to reveal what it is like to be stereotyped based on our gender, age, race, class, or any of the ways by which we culturally classify one another. What he discovers is that this experience of "stereotype threat" can profoundly affect our functioning: undermining our performance, causing emotional and physiological reactions, and affecting our career and relationship choices. But because these threats, though little recognized, are near-daily and life-shaping for all of us, the shared experience of them can help bring Americans closer together. Always aware of the ways that identity plays out in the lives of real people, his conclusions shed new light on a host of American social phenomena, from the racial gender gaps in test scores to the belief in the superior athletic prowess of black men. In a time of renewed discourse about race and class, this work offers insight into how we form our sense of self, and lays out a plan that will both reduce the negative effects of "stereotype threat" and begin reshaping American identities

Cover of Who Are You? The Kid's Gui
by Brook Pessin-Whedbee
9781785927287
2017

Who are you? is an introduction to gender for ages 3+, with straightforward language for talking about how we experience gender: our body, our expression,and our gender identity. Ideal for use in the classroom or at home, it includes an interactive wheel and a guide for adults, explaining key concepts and identifying useful discussion points.

NPR Life Kit Logo
by Cory Turner, NPR and Sesame Workshop
2019

A majority of parents rarely, if ever, discuss race/ethnicity, gender, class or other categories of social identity with their kids, according to a new, nationally representative survey of more than 6,000 parents conducted by Sesame Workshop and NORC at the University of Chicago. The researchers behind Sesame Street say the fact that so many families aren't talking about these issues is a problem because children are hard-wired to notice differences at a young age — and they're asking questions. For the past year, NPR and Sesame Workshop have collaborated on a podcast for parents — part of NPR's Life Kit project. Together, they've covered all sorts of subjects, from how to raise kind kids and navigate divorce to how to talk with children about death. Earlier this year, NPR and Sesame Workshop devoted an entire episode to the importance of talking about race and other social categories with kids and provided parents with some helpful strategies.

Cover of
by Beverly Daniel Tatum
046509127X
1997

Beverly Daniel Tatum, a renowned authority on the psychology of racism, asserts that we do not know how to talk about our racial differences: Whites are afraid of using the wrong words and being perceived as "racist" while parents of color are afraid of exposing their children to painful racial realities too soon. Using real-life examples and the latest research, Tatum presents strong evidence that straight talk about our racial identities-whatever they may be-is essential if we are serious about facilitating communication across racial and ethnic divide.