MADreads

A review of It's Not Like it's a Secret by Misa Sugira

I tried it, and I liked it! I’m not usually into angsty teen romance novels, but Sugiura provides plenty of layers to this one. Sana is discovering her sexual identity (lesbian), she is discovering her father’s infidelity (he is having an affair of sorts), and at the same time she is struggling with her peers’ racism (she is of Japanese descent), and her own racism (she falls for a Latina girl at her high school and stumbles with her own preconceived beliefs). All of this is a lot for a coming ...read more

Reviewed by Karen on
April 13, 2018 | 0 comments
A review of The Gentle Art of Swedish Death Cleaning: How to Free Yourself and Your Family from a Lifetime of Clutter by Margareta Magnusson

The title of this book might put you off, but the topic is real and it is important. There is a kind of decluttering in Sweden called dostadning. Do means "death" and stadning means "cleaning." The author, Margareta Magnusson, suggests ways in which we can prepare our homes and possessions to make the most of them while we are still living and to ease the burden on others after we have died. She promotes minimalist living and choosing clothing, furniture and artifacts with care, especially as ...read more

Reviewed by Molly - Central on
April 12, 2018 | 0 comments
A review of Hello Stranger by Lisa Kleypas

In her latest in the Ravenals series, Kleypas has loosely based the heroine on a real historical figure, Elizabeth Garrett Anderson, the first (and only, for many years) female doctor in England. Kleypas' Dr. Garrett Gibson is also the lone female physician of her time and she does work in London and those are broadly the only things they have in common. Though Garrett's skills are in evidence throughout the novel, this is a romance, so it's not really about that. On her way home one night ...read more

Reviewed by Jane J on
April 10, 2018 | 0 comments
A review of Bear & Hare, Where’s Bear? by Emily Gravett

The Bear & Hare books are such fun to share with young readers! Toddlers and preschoolers will enjoy the humor and charm of each one – and you will, too! To practice counting and have a first introduction to hide-and-seek, check out Bear & Hare, Where’s Bear? (Simon & Schuster, 2016). The pacing is perfect – and the illustrations are very silly. Readers get to practice counting from 1 to 10 several times as bear and hare take turns hiding. When Hare can’t find Bear at the very end, ...read more

Reviewed by Tracy on
April 6, 2018 | 0 comments
A review of Wolf in the Snow by Matthew Cordell

Winner of the coveted 2018 Randolph Caldecott Medal for the most distinguished American picture book for children, Wolf in the Snow artistically explores themes of moving beyond fear and mistrust of “the other” to a place of caring and helping. Cordell’s watercolor illustrations depict a little girl and a wolf cub who find each other in a blizzard that renders each of them lost ...read more

Reviewed by Karen on
April 5, 2018 | 0 comments
A review of Game, Set, Match: Billie Jean King and the Revolution in Women’s Sports by Susan Ware

Unusually for me, I was reading two non-fiction books concurrently, this one and The Taste of Empire. Like that one, this one good and interesting. Yes, it is about Billie Jean King but it is more than that. The author is looking at King's rise to the top of "women's" tennis, the ebb and flow of the feminist movement, and the impact of Title IX funding on sports, especially women's sports. Back when I was growing up in the 50’s and 60’s there were no organized sports for females. I was ...read more

Reviewed by Liz - Sequoya on
April 3, 2018 | 0 comments
A review of The Immortalists by Chloe Benjamin

Author Chloe Benjamin read from her new book The Immortalists to a packed house at the first Wisconsin Book Festival event of 2018. It was a cold night but spirits were high at Cooper's Tavern as the author shared the news that her book was about to debut on The New York Times bestsellers list. Now Benjamin has been named the featured author at this year’s Book Club Café. Stay tuned for more details about that big event ...read more

Reviewed by Molly - Central on
April 2, 2018 | 0 comments
A review of Water is Water by Miranda Paul

A perfect book for spring! In this non-fiction book, Wisconsin author Miranda Paul weaves a brilliant and accurate account of the water cycle through the seasons in whimsical and engaging rhyming verse. With awesome full page, water color illustrations following a family of kids jumping in a lake in the summer, splashing in puddles on their way to school in the fall, and having a snowball fight, your Wisconsin family will see themselves and their adventures reflected, while still learning all ...read more

Reviewed by Rebecca on
March 30, 2018 | 0 comments
A review of Roomies by Christina Lauren

Marriage of convenience plots are a not-uncommon trope in the romance genre, but generally they work a bit better in historical romances (where marriage for practical purposes just feels more possible). In contemporary novels the MOC usually comes about from a couple of scenarios; either there's an inheritance at stake or someone needs to gain a green card. With Roomies, we're talking about the second scenario and it mostly works. Holland Bakker is at a bit of a standstill in terms of ...read more

Reviewed by Jane J on
March 29, 2018 | 0 comments
New Mysteries Winter is coming to a close and Spring is almost here. There are a bunch of new mysteries that I am looking forward to reading. There are some new characters that I want to meet and some old friends with whom I'll be catching up. Are there any new mysteries that you are waiting to read?    The Widows of Malabar Hill by Sujata Massey [1/9] [new series]character: Perveen Mistry, one of ...read more

Reviewed by Kathy K. - Central on
March 28, 2018 | 0 comments
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