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MADreads

Book reviews by library staff and guest contributors

Rock-a-bye

Cover of Love and the Rocking Chair
A review of Love and the Rocking Chair by Leo Dillon

The beautiful and hearfelt final collaboration of amazing illustrators, Love and the Rocking Chair echos the intergenerational love of Robert Munsch's Love You Forever. Partners in life and art, artists Leo and Diane Dillon received Caldecott and Coretta Scott King medals, among many other awards, and Love and the Rocking Chair is both a precious gift to parents and grandparents as well as a fitting memorial to Leo (who died in 2012). Keep your tissues handy and prepare for tears of love, gratitude, and hope!

Jan 24, 2020

International Holocaust Remembrance Day

Cover of Holocaust survivor stories
Holocaust survivor stories
January 27th is International Holocaust Remembrance Day. It also marks the 75th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz. Below of list of survivor stories. By reading about their experiences we can remember and reflect on this dark time in our history. 
 
Jan 23, 2020

4th quarter book report

Cover of Mystery Book Group
Mystery Book Group

For the last part of 2019 the mystery book group read a modern mystery classic, a generation-spanning, family crime story and a twisty thriller. Of the three the twisty thriller was my favorite, the group's favorite and our best discussion item, so we ended the year on a high note.

Jan 21, 2020

What was it like being a new adult before the internet?

Cover of Do You Mind If I Cancel?:
A review of Do You Mind If I Cancel?: (Things That Still Annoy Me) by Gary Janetti

I'll tell you what it was like: there were tons of phone calls. On a landline. Everything took forever. If you made plans with a friend to meet up and one of you went to the wrong location, there was no way to connect with them. You both went back home and that was the end of it. It's not that life was easier or harder but communication and work were different. Gary Janetti's book captures this time with perfection and hilarity.

Some of the things that I enjoy most about Gary:

Jan 17, 2020

Women on the verge...

Cover of The Summer Without Men
A review of The Summer Without Men by Siri Hustvedt

After 30 years together, Mia’s husband Boris announces that he needs a “pause” in their marriage. This sends Mia off the deep end and she is locked up and medicated in a mental hospital for a week and a half. Once discharged, she realizes she can’t stay alone in her Brooklyn apartment, so she leaves to spend the summer in her Minnesota hometown where her mother is living in a senior community.

Jan 15, 2020

Into the heart of Dixie

Cover of A Longer Fall
A review of A Longer Fall by Charlaine Harris

Gunslinger Lizbeth Rose lives in what used to be the United States, but after the assassination of FDR in the 1930s Texas and Oklahoma have become a small land of their own known as Texoma. Other parts of the US have been ceded back to Britain (the northeast), Canada (the upper midwest), and the far west the last Tsar to escape Russia. And the rest of the south (not Texas and Oklahoma) is known as Dixie and has reverted to a post-Civil War, reconstruction society in which race relations are very, very bad.

Jan 14, 2020

Peace and...

Cover of Charlotte and the Quiet Pl
A review of Charlotte and the Quiet Place by Deborah Sosin

Looking for a way to help your child find their own quiet place in a busy, noisy, clambering world? Charlotte and the Quiet Place by Deborah Sosin takes a gentle look at how to find quiet and peacefulness inside your own self. Charlotte, the young protagonist in the story, lives in a noisy house, a noisy neighborhood, and a noisy school. She has trouble finding one spot that’s quiet and peaceful. Then, one day while she’s walking her dog, she finds a place in nature – that’s quieter than quiet.

Jan 10, 2020

Mannerling wants your soul

A review of Daughters of Mannerling Series by Marion Chesney

I’m not one who typically goes back and reads classic romance authors since I often have my hands full of newly released titles, but when a colleague extolled the virtues of Marion Chesney’s Regency-set romances, I was intrigued enough to check out the audio recording of The Banishment, the first title in Chesney’s Daughters of Mannerling series. It was short, and the audio appealed as much as the print version’s dated and ugly covers did not. Well, dear reader, I did not know what I was getting into.

Jan 9, 2020

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