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MADreads

Book reviews by library staff and guest contributors

Multitudes silenced

Cover of Vox
A review of Vox by Christina Dalcher

In a time not too far in the future in an America that seems all to scarily possible at times, half the population has been silenced. For fans who have binged through The Handmaid's Tale (and/or read the book) Vox can be your next dystopian read.

August 15, 2018

Sweet Anticipation for September

Sweet Anticipation Graphic
New Titles

As readers and publishers head into fall, the year’s publishing trends show no signs of stopping. Crunching the numbers, Publisher’s Weekly reports that Americans seem to be embracing reality, at least of the printed variety: nonfiction sales are up 5% from last year, driven in large part by political titles. It comes at the cost of fiction sales, which are down about the same amount. Not surprisingly, publishers are responding by bringing out and promoting their big nonfiction titles, and as September marks the start of the fall publishing push, some of those titles are hitting sh

August 14, 2018

A walk down the psycho path

Cover of Lying in Wait
A review of Lying in Wait by Liz Nugent

There are people who don't recognize good and bad. They appear normal, even charming, but lack conscience and empathy. They see others as objects to use for their own benefit. They are called psychopaths. They are out there, wandering among us, and there's nothing we can do about it.

Liz Nugent's Lying in Wait is about just such a person. The path to who this person is and what they are willing to do leads the reader on a terrifying maze of twists and turns of shock and second-guessing, and in my case, a little shrieking.

August 13, 2018

Awwwkward...

Cover of The Proposal
A review of The Proposal by Jasmine Guillory

In Guillory's second contemporary romance the hero's best friend from book one (The Wedding Date) gets his chance to find love - even if he's convinced that he doesn't have the time or space in his life for it. 

August 9, 2018

Rain Forest Fun

Cover of Little Kids First Big Book
A review of Little Kids First Big Book of the Rain Forest by Moira Rose Donohue

Get off your devices. That’s right, just set them aside, grab this book and open to the title page spread where you will see the cutest!!, most adorable, awwww- inspiring photograph of a mama three-toed sloth and her baby in their natural environment.  And that’s just the title page. 

August 9, 2018

It's time

Cover of Dear Madam President: An O
A review of Dear Madam President: An Open Letter to the Women Who Will Run the World by Jennifer Palmieri

Not only is this an open letter to the women who will run the world one day, it's also a first-hand account of what it was like to be a part of Hillary Clinton's presidential campaign and how future candidates (and all of us) can learn from the way a woman candidate was treated and how upcoming elections will be different.

August 6, 2018

Death and antiquities

Cover of Scandal Above Stairs
A review of Scandal Above Stairs by Jennifer Ashley

Resourceful cook Kat Holloway has a new mystery to solve in the second of this historical mystery series. Though Kat is still the cook for Lord Rankin's household in Victorian London, but the people she's cooking for have changed a bit (after the events of Death Below Stairs). Lord Rankin has departed for the country and Lady Cynthia, though nominally chaperoned by an aunt and uncle, is left mostly to her own devices.

August 3, 2018

He'll shake the universe

Cover of Empire of Silence
A review of Empire of Silence by Christopher Ruocchio

I knew nothing about Ruocchio's debut, first in the Sun Eater series, when I was assigned to read it for another review. And at first glance I thought, hmmm, it's pretty long, it's going to take a long time to read. If I say I finished it in a couple days, you'll get an idea as to how exhilarating it was and how much I loved it.

August 2, 2018

Sex and the history

Cover of Sex and the City and Us: H
A review of Sex and the City and Us: How Four Single Women Changed the Way We Think, Live, and Love by Jennifer Armstrong

I’m a total Carrie.

How about you?

If you’re fan enough to get my meaning, especially if you dig behind-the-scenes showbiz nonfiction, you will probably love entertainment journalist Jennifer Keishin Armstrong’s fresh look at the enduring zeitgeistiness of HBO’s landmark sitcom Sex and the City.   

July 31, 2018

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