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Read Local - February 19, 2018

Read Local
 

Read Local

Monday, February 19, 2018

New books written by local authors from the Madison/Dane County area in the library's collection.

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Questions? Email madtech@madisonpubliclibrary.org

Every Farm Tells a Story A Tale of Family Values
by Apps, Jerry

In this paperback edition of a beloved Jerry Apps classic, the rural historian captures the heart and soul of life in rural America. Inspired by his mother's farm account books--in which she meticulously recorded every farm purchase--Jerry chronicles life on a small farm during and after World War II. Featuring a new introduction exclusive to this 2nd edition, Every Farm Tells a Story reminds us that, while our family farms are shrinking in number, the values learned there remain deeply woven in our cultural heritage.  Here, the author details the virtues and hardships of rural living: "Do your chores without complaining. Show up on time. Do every job well. Always try to do better. Never stop learning. Next year will be better. Care for others, especially those who have less than you. Accept those who are different from you. Love the land."

How to Make a Life A Tibetan Refugee Family and the Midwestern Woman They Adopted
by Uraneck, Madeline

An evocative blend of immersion journalism and memoir, How to Make a Life shares the immigration story of a Tibetan refugee family who crossed real and cultural bridges to make a life in Madison, Wisconsin, with the assistance of the Midwestern woman they befriended. From tales of escaping Tibet over the Himalayas, to striking a balance between old traditions with new, to bridging divides one friendly gesture at a time, readers will expand their understanding of family, culture, and belonging.

Living a Country Year Wit and Wisdom from the Good Old Days
by Apps, Jerry

In this paperback edition of a beloved Jerry Apps classic, the rural historian tells stories from his childhood days on a small central Wisconsin dairy farm in the 1930s and 1950s. From a January morning memory of pancakes piled high after chores, to a June day spent learning to ride a pony named Ginger, Jerry moves through the turn of the seasons and teaches gentle lessons about life on the farm. With recipes associated with each month and a new introduction exclusive to this 2nd edition, Living a Country Year celebrates the rhythms of rural life with warmth and humor.

The Story of Act 31 How Native History Came to Wisconsin Classrooms
by Leary, J P

Since its passage in 1989, a state law known as Act 31 requires that all students in Wisconsin learn about the history, culture, and tribal sovereignty of Wisconsin's federally recognized tribes.  The Story of Act 31 tells the story of the law's inception--tracing its origins to a court decision in 1983 that affirmed American Indian hunting and fishing treaty rights in Wisconsin, and to the violent public outcry that followed the court's decision. Author J P Leary paints a picture of controversy stemming from past policy decisions that denied generations of Wisconsin students the opportunity to learn about tribal history.

Taking Flight A History of Birds and People in the Heart of America
by Edmonds, Michael

Author and birder Michael Edmonds has combed archaeological reports, missionaries' journals, travelers' letters, early scientific treatises, the memoirs of American Indian elders, and the folklore of hunters, farmers, and formerly enslaved people throughout the Midwest to reveal how our ancestors thought about the very same birds we see today.  Taking Flight explores how and why people have worshipped, feared, studied, hunted, eaten, and protected the birds that surrounded them.  Whether you're a casual bird-watcher, a hard-core life-lister, or simply someone who loves the outdoors, you'll look at birds differently after reading this book.

Wisconsin Riffs Jazz Profiles from the Heartland
by Dietrich, Kurt

Kurt Dietrich is a professor of music and the Barbara Baldwin DeFrees Chair in the Performing Arts at Ripon College. He is the author of Duke's Bones: Ellington's Great Trombonists, as well as numerous articles for publications including Annual Review of Jazz Studies and Black Music Research Journal. He is a longtime player of jazz and has performed on numerous recordings.