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Library Kids - March 9, 2018

Library Kids

Friday, March 9, 2018

 

Library Kids is Madison Public Library's email newsletter featuring news, events, and recommended books for kids PreK through grade 6.

March 9, 2018 Issue

In this issue:

 

 

Women's History Month

Women's History Month

March is Women's History Month! Celebrate the accomplishments of women throughout history - explore their stories and honor their countless contributions.

We have lots of books for kids of all ages to learn about amazing women throughout history. Some titles include:

Amelia and Eleanor Go for a Ride by Pam Muñoz Ryan 
Chasing Freedom: The Life Journeys of Harriet Tubman and Susan B. Anthony by Nikki Grimes 
Different Like Coco by Elizabeth Matthews 
Frida Kahlo and Her Animalitos by Monica Brown 
Girls Think of Everything: Stories of Ingenious inventions by Women by Catherine Thimmesh 
The Gutsy Girl: Escapades for Your Life of Epic Adventure by Caroline Paul 
Hidden Figures: The True Story of Four Black Women and the Space Race by Margot Lee Shetterly 
Inside Out & Back Again by Thanhha Lai 
Marley Dias Gets It Done: And So Can You! by Marley Dias 
She Persisted: 13 American Women Who Changed the World by Chelsea Clinton 
Sojourner Truth's Step-Stomp Stride by Andrea Davis Pinkney 

Find these books featured below - and visit our website to find events, book suggestions, and resources for adults, too!

 

Color, Doodle, Draw

Color, Doodle, Draw

Dive into the world of cartooning, enjoy some calm coloring, design a bookmark for someone else to find - there are numerous possibilities for kids and adults alike to be creative.

Take a look at upcoming events!

 

Family Fun Nights

Family Fun Nights

Fridays are for Family Fun Nights! Bring the whole family to events meant to entertain, educate, and engage children and their parents. Enjoy a movie night, write a little poetry, explore science, and so much more.

All events take place at Goodman South Madison Library from 6:00-7:00pm. Upcoming events include:

March 9: The LEGO Batman Movie (PG) 
March 16: St. Patrick’s Day Sing-Along 
March 23: Felt and Doodle Stitching 
March 30: Board Game Night

See the complete list of Family Fun Night events.

Family Fun Nights are funded by a gift from The Capital Times Kids Fund.

 

Upcoming Events

Find a complete event listing in our Spring Kidspages or find Chess ClubsKnitting ClubsLEGO ClubsMinecraft Clubs or Storytimes for ages 0-5

Family Movie Night: The LEGO Batman Movie
Friday, March 9, 6:00-7:00pm - Goodman South Madison Library

Saturday Morning Cartooning
Saturday, March 10, 10:00-11:00am - Sequoya Library

LEGO Buildathon
Saturday, March 10, 10:30-11:30am - Lakeview Library

Dance Wisconsin: Mini Performance
Saturday, March 10, 1:00am-2:00pm - Central Library

Saturday Family Matinee: LEGO NINJAGO
Saturday, March 10, 2:30-4:30pm - Pinney Library

Read and Make: Imagination Station with Mystery Boxes!
Monday, March 12, 2:30-3:30pm - Hawthorne Library

Anji Play Date
Wednesdays: March 14 - April 18 (EXCEPT 3/28), 10:30am-12:30pm - Lussier Community Center

Kids Code Madison
Thursdays: March 15-22, 6:00-7:30pm - Hawthorne Library

Screen-Printing with Lesley Numbers (A Bubbler Program)
Friday, March 16, 10:00-11:00am - Hawthorne Library

Makerpalooza: Stop Motion Animation
Saturday, March 17, 2:00-3:00pm - Pinney Library

Star Wars Club
Wednesday, March 21, 3:30-4:30pm - Goodman South Madison Library

Cooking with Chef Lily
Monday, March 26, 12:00-1:15pm - Meadowridge Library (Ages 5-8)
Monday March 26, 2:00-3:15pm - Meadowridge Library (Ages 9-12)

Fifth Fridays: Poetry Improv Featuring Guy Thorvalsen
Friday, March 30, 6:30-8:30pm - Alicia Ashman Library

Preschool and Toddler Dance Party
Saturday, April 7, 10:00-10:45am - Monroe Street Library

 

Tablet Tips

Tablet Tips

Do apps calm your kid down? When children get upset, parents often reach for the quick fix of a screen. While fine in a pinch, on the occasions when you have a little more time to deal with a meltdown encourage your child to try other calming techniques -- slow breaths talking about their feelings, going for a walk, having a big stomping contest, or just collapsing in tears within a safe, loving hug.

Take a look at Carissa's App Picks for Kids reviews and subscribe to her e-newsletter to get regular app reviews sent straight to your inbox!

 

New Books

 

 

Amelia and Eleanor Go for a Ride
by Pam Muñoz Ryan

 

An inspiring true story of Amelia Earheart and Eleanor Roosevelt -- and a thrilling night when they made history together. On a brisk and cloudless evening in April 1933, Amelia Earheart and Eleanor Roosevelt did the unprecedented: They stole away from a White House dinner, commandeered an Eastern Air Transport plane and took off on a glorious adventure -- while still dressed in their glamorous evening gowns!

 

 

 

Chasing Freedom: The Life Journeys of Harriet Tubman and Susan B. Anthony
by Nikki Grimes

 

What if Harriet Tubman and Susan B. Anthony sat down over tea to reminisce about their extraordinary lives? What would they recall of their triumphs and struggles as they fought to achieve civil rights for African Americans and equal rights for women? And what other historical figures played parts in their stories? These questions led Coretta Scott King Award winner Nikki Grimes to create Chasing Freedom, an engaging work of historical fiction about two of the nineteenth century's most powerful, and inspiring, American women.

 

 

 

Different Like Coco
by Elizabeth Matthews

 

Gabrielle "Coco" Chanel was always different. And she vowed to prove that being different was an advantage! Poor, skinny, and orphaned, Coco stubbornly believed that she was as good as the wealthier girls of Paris. Tapping into her creativity and her sewing skills, she began making clothes that suited her (and her pocketbook) -- and soon a new generation of independent working women craved her sleek, comfortable, and practical designs. Now an icon of fashion and culture, Coco Chanel continues to inspire young readers, showing just how far a person can come with spunk, determination, and flair.

 

 

 

Frida Kahlo and Her Animalitos
by Monica Brown 

 

The fascinating Mexican artist Frida Kahlo is remembered for her self-portraits, her dramatic works featuring bold and vibrant colors. Her work brought attention to Mexican and indigenous culture and she is also renowned for her works celebrating the female form. Brown's story recounts Frida's beloved pets--two monkeys, a parrot, three dogs, two turkeys, an eagle, a black cat, and a fawn--and playfully considers how Frida embodied many wonderful characteristics of each animal.

 

 

 

Girls Think of Everything: Stories of Ingenious inventions by Women
by Catherine Thimmesh

 

In kitchens and living rooms, in garages and labs and basements, even in converted chicken coops, women and girls have invented ingenious innovations that have made our lives simpler and better. Their creations are some of the most enduring (the windshield wiper) and best loved (the chocolate chip cookie). What inspired these women, and just how did they turn their ideas into realities?

 

 

 

The Gutsy Girl: Escapades for Your Life of Epic Adventure
by Caroline Paul

 

Why should girls miss out on the joy of adventure? They can jump off rocks, swing on ropes, and climb trees just as well as boys can. But girls often allow fear to stand in their way. In The Gutsy Girl, author Caroline Paul emboldens girls to seek out a life of exhilaration. Once a young scaredy-cat herself, Caroline decided that fear got in the way of the life she wanted. The Gutsy Girl is Lean In for young girls, a book about the glorious things that happen when you unshackle from fear and open up to exhilaration.

 

 

 

Hidden Figures: The True Story of Four Black Women and the Space Race
by Margot Lee Shetterly

 

Dorothy Vaughan, Mary Jackson, Katherine Johnson, and Christine Darden were good at math...really good. They participated in some of NASA's greatest successes, like providing the calculations for America's first journeys into space. And they did so during a time when being black and a woman limited what they could do. But they worked hard. They persisted. And they used their genius minds to change the world. In this beautifully illustrated picture book edition, we explore the story of four female African American mathematicians at NASA, known as "colored computers," and how they overcame gender and racial barriers to succeed in a highly challenging STEM-based career.

 

 

 

Inside Out & Back Again
by Thanhha Lai

 

Inspired by the author's childhood experience as a refugee--fleeing Vietnam after the Fall of Saigon and immigrating to Alabama--this coming-of-age debut novel told in verse has been celebrated for its touching child's-eye view of family and immigration.

 

 

 

Marley Dias Gets It Done: And So Can You!
by Marley Dias

 

In this accessible "keep-it-real" guide, Marley explores activism, social justice, volunteerism, equity and inclusion, and using social media for good. Drawing from her experience, Marley shows kids how they can galvanize their strengths to make positive changes in their communities, while getting support from parents, teachers, and friends to turn dreams into reality.

 

 

 

She Persisted: 13 American Women Who Changed the World 
by Chelsea Clinton

 

Chelsea Clinton introduces tiny feminists, mini activists and little kids who are ready to take on the world to thirteen inspirational women who never took no for an answer, and who always, inevitably and without fail, persisted .

 

 

 

Sojourner Truth's Step-Stomp Stride
by Andrea Davis Pinkney

 

Born into slavery, Belle had to endure the cruelty of several masters before she escaped to freedom. But she knew she wouldn't really be free unless she was helping to end injustice. That's when she changed her name to Sojourner and began traveling across the country, demanding equal rights for black people and for women. Many people weren't ready for her message, but Sojourner was brave, and her truth was powerful. And slowly, but surely as Sojourner's step-stomp stride, America began to change.