Back to top

Events Calendar

Please note that this calendar only contains library programs. For room availability, please contact the appropriate library directly.

Looking for a specific event? Try our Events Search page.

Friday, September 13, 2019

Time Items
All day
 
1pm
Drop-In Basic Computer Help

Drop-In Basic Computer Help

Friday, Sep 13, 1:00pm to 5:00pm

Get help with basic computer questions: email, printing, filling out online forms, etc.

Drop-in computer help is a partnership between Madison Public library and WISE, Wisconsin Senior Employment Program

 
3pm
Dream Bus at Allied Park

Dream Bus at Allied Park

Allied Park (2370 Revival Ridge)
Friday, Sep 13, 3:00pm to 5:00pm

Get a library card, browse and check out materials, return items, place and pick up holds, and use the free WiFi.

Allied Park (2370 Revival Ridge)
 
5pm
Movie Night: The Public

Movie Night: The Public

Community Room
Friday, Sep 13, 5:45pm to 7:45pm

An unusually bitter Arctic blast has made its way to downtown Cincinnati and the front doors of the public library where the action of the film takes place. At odds with library officials over how to handle the extreme weather event, some homeless patrons turn the building into a shelter for the night by staging an "Occupy" sit in. What begins as an act of civil disobedience becomes a stand-off with police and a rush-to-judgment media constantly speculating about what's really happening. This David versus Goliath story tackles some of our nation's most challenging issues: homelessness and mental illness, and sets the drama inside one of the last bastions of democracy-in-action: your public library.
PG-13, 2 hours 2 minutes

Community Room
 
6pm
Family Friday Movie Night--THE LEGO MOVIE 2 (PG)

Family Friday Movie Night--THE LEGO MOVIE 2 (PG)

Meeting Room
Friday, Sep 13, 6:00pm to 8:00pm

Starring Chris Pratt, Elizabeth Banks & Will Arnett.
It's been five years since everything was awesome and the citizens are facing a huge new threat: Lego Duplo invaders from outer space, wrecking everything faster than they can rebuild.
[PG, 1hr 47min, Animation|Action|Adventure, 2019]

Fabulous fun on a Friday night.

Meeting Room
 
7pm
New Game! (anime)

New Game! (anime)

Community Room
Friday, Sep 13, 7:00pm to 8:45pm

After graduating high school, Suzukaze Aoba joins Eagle Jump, the game company that developed Fairies Story, the game she obsessed over as a kid. On her first day as a working member of society, Aoba heads to work swaying in a packed, morning rush hour train. She manages to get to the office building all right but hesitates, wondering if it was really okay for her to take that last step and go inside. That's when a senior member of staff, Toyama Rin, shows up at work and safely leads Aoba inside the offices of Eagle Jump

The Hawthorne Anime Club was created to give people a place to gather, watch, and talk about Japanese animation. Each meeting will include screenings of everything from classic titles to new releases. The club is aimed primarily at teens and adults. Films are shown in Japanese with English subtitles. Refreshments served at each meeting.

Call ahead to reserve your spot! People under age 16 who are interested in attending are required to have a parent present or to have a signed parental permission slip.

Community Room
 
Wisconsin Book Festival Presents Christopher Leonard for Kochland

Wisconsin Book Festival Presents Christopher Leonard for Kochland

Friday, Sep 13, 7:00pm to 8:00pm

Just as Steve Coll told the story of globalization through ExxonMobil and Andrew Ross Sorkin told the story of Wall Street excess through Too Big to Fail, Christopher Leonard’s Kochland: The Secret History of Koch Industries and Corporate Power in America uses the extraordinary account of how one of the biggest private companies in the world grew to be that big to tell the story of modern corporate America.

Christopher Leonard is a business reporter whose work has appeared in The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, Fortune, and Bloomberg Businessweek. He is the author of The Meat Racket and Kochland, which won the J. Anthony Lukas Work-in-Progress Award. He will autograph books after the reading.

Learn more at https://www.wisconsinbookfestival.org/events/kochland

 
Wisconsin Book Festival presents Christopher Leonard for KOCHLAND

Wisconsin Book Festival presents Christopher Leonard for KOCHLAND

Meeting Rooms 301 & 302
Friday, Sep 13, 7:00pm to 8:00pm

Just as Steve Coll told the story of globalization through ExxonMobil and Andrew Ross Sorkin told the story of Wall Street excess through Too Big to Fail, Christopher Leonard’s Kochland uses the extraordinary account of how one of the biggest private companies in the world grew to be that big to tell the story of modern corporate America. The annual revenue of Koch Industries is bigger than that of Goldman Sachs, Facebook, and U.S. Steel combined. Koch is everywhere: from the fertilizers that make our food to the chemicals that make our pipes to the synthetics that make our carpets and diapers to the Wall Street trading in all these
commodities. But few people know much about Koch Industries and that’s because the billionaire Koch brothers want it that way. For five decades, CEO Charles Koch has kept Koch Industries quietly operating in deepest secrecy, with a view toward very, very long-term profits. He’s a genius businessman: patient with earnings, able to learn from his mistakes, determined that his employees develop a reverence for free-market ruthlessness, and a master disrupter. These strategies have made him and his brother David together richer than Bill Gates. But there’s another side to this story. If you want to understand how we killed the unions in this country, how we widened the income divide, stalled progress on climate change, and how our corporations bought the influence industry, all you have to do is read this book. Seven years in the making, Kochland reads like a true-life thriller, with larger-than-life characters driving the battles on every page. The book tells the ambitious tale of how one private company consolidated power over half a century—and how in doing so, it helped transform capitalism into something that feels deeply alienating to many Americans today.

Meeting Rooms 301 & 302