MADreads for Teens

A review of Bomb: The Race to Build and Steal the World's Most Dangerous Weapon by Steve Sheinkin

It’s that time of year again, and I’m reading as many books as I can to find the lucky ten titles that will serve as the summer’s Teen’s Choice review books. This year’s list will include the cross-over kid’s/teen’s non-fiction title that has swept up so many awards that it is fairly dripping with medals. Yes, Bomb: The Race to Build – and Steal – the World’s Most Dangerous Weapon, by Steve Sheinkin. National Book Award Finalist, Sibert Award for best children’s non-fiction, Best Non- ...read more

Reviewed by Karen on
May 3, 2013 | 0 comments
A review of Pivot Point by Kasie West

At a school where the football team uses telekinesis to keep balls aloft and other students can manipulate mass to walk through walls, Addie Coleman doesn't think her ability to search the possible outcomes of her choices is terribly glamorous, since she can only see her own future, and only when she faces a specific choice. Still, it's a pretty handy power, and it's one that is particularly useful as she faces the biggest decision of her life so far: which parent she wants to live with after ...read more

Reviewed by Kylee on
April 29, 2013 | 0 comments
A review of Midwinterblood by Marcus Sedgwick

It takes a pretty spectacular writer to combine vampires, love at first sight, and reincarnation in a teen novel and still come up with something fresh and original, but that's exactly what Marcus Sedgwick has done in his new book, Midwinterblood. This collection of seven linked stories begins in the year 2073, when loner journalist Eric Seven is sent to investigate a colony on the remote northern Blessed Island, where the inhabitants are rumored to have discovered an elixir of ...read more

Reviewed by Kylee on
April 9, 2013 | 0 comments
A review of The Diviners by Libba Bray

The latest offering from supernatural master, Libba Bray, is sure to thrill fans of her last series. Set in 1920s New York, The Diviners follows seventeen year old Evie O’Neill who has been banished from her hometown in Ohio after a party trick has unintended consequences. Evie, a quintessential flapper, is thrilled with the arrangement, planning her days around shopping and movies and her nights around glamorous speakeasies. The only drawback is living with her uncle, the stuffy ...read more

Reviewed by Jill O on
March 22, 2013 | 0 comments
Novels to the Screen (big and small) Shelley Diaz of School Library Journal has compiled a nice list of teen (and kids) books that are coming to the screens in your neighborhood. The first to jump out at me is the film adaptation of Stephanie Meyer's The Host. I'm curious about this ...read more

Reviewed by Jane J - Central on
March 21, 2013 | 1 comment
A review of Etiquette & Espionage by Gail Carriger

It's been a while since I've read a rave-worthy young adult novel. But lately I've hit the bonanza with several titles hitting on all notes. Some of the hits aren't yet published so I'll leave those for a future post, but one of them is out and available and I'm thrilled that I can tell you about it. Etiquette & Espionage by Gail Carriger is set in the same ...read more

Reviewed by Jane J - Central on
March 12, 2013 | 0 comments
A review of Warm Bodies by Isaac Marion

What will the inevitable zombie apocalypse look like? How will it happen? How will humanity--the Living--survive? How does it feel be be a zombie? And how--in this post-apocalyptic world-- would a zombie find love? That last question has never, in all my feverish wonderings, occurred to me. And yet, I give you...Warm Bodies by Isaac Marion. The main protagonist of our story is a zombie. You got it, a flesh-eating, brain-chomping, reeking member of the undead, or the Dead, in this ...read more

Reviewed by Tina - Central on
March 5, 2013 | 1 comment
A review of Peanut by Ayun Halliday

Starting a new high school is not easy. Starting a new high school under false pretenses is even harder. Starting a new high school while faking a peanut allergy? Oh, that's not going to end well. Sadie Wildhack fakes a peanut allergy in order to make friends at her new high school and it totally backfires. Even though peanut allergies may be life threatening, they're just not glamorous enough to sway jaded high school students into providing a)sympathy b)respect c)friendship. Or are they? The ...read more

Reviewed by Molly - Central on
February 27, 2013 | 0 comments
A review of The Diviners by Libba Bray

I'm going to be completely honest about this: I had been looking forward to reading The Diviners for most of 2012 but when it first showed up on the hold shelf for me and I discovered it was 578 pages, I paused a little. OK, I paused a lot, like, for 28 days, and then had to bring the book back to the library without even having started it.  So I placed it on hold again and decided to dedicate myself to it when it next arrived. That time is now. Here's the scoop: Evangeline (Evie ...read more

Reviewed by Molly - Central on
January 22, 2013 | 0 comments
A review of Never Fall Down by Patricia McCormick

At first I found the language jarring, but as I continued to read, I found myself engrossed in McCormick’s fictionalization of Arn Chorn-Pond’s story of his years as a child caught in a horrific combination of genocide and war in Cambodia during the reign of the Kmehr Rouge.When the Kmehr Rouge come to his village and begin rounding up his family, friends and neighbors, Arn’s Aunt advises him to “bend low, and then bend lower” in order to survive. From age 11 to 14, Arn bends in ways no one ...read more

Reviewed by Karen on
January 11, 2013 | 0 comments