MADreads for Teens

A review of Exit, Pursued by a Bear by E.K Johnston

Hermione Winters is living that golden child life. She’s a popular, talented cheerleader. She has a supportive family. She has a fulfilling relationship with Polly, her best friend and co-captain. She has a devoted boyfriend that she could take or leave, which is a pretty sweet position to be in. She’s smart, well-liked and can’t wait to start her senior year leading her team in the sport that she loves so much. Then she is drugged, raped, and left unconscious in a lake at cheerleading camp. more

Reviewed by Beth on
April 6, 2016 | 0 comments
A review of Burn Baby Burn Burn Baby Burn by Meg Medina

A record-breaking heatwave, race riots, and an elusive killer on the loose-- the summer of 1977 in Queens, NY can only be described as infamous. For Norah Lopez, it’s the summer she graduates high school, the summer she was supposed to spend going dancing with her best friend, flirting with Pablo, the cute stockboy at work, and plotting a way out of the stifling apartment she shares with her mother and little brother. Sometimes summers don’t turn out the way we plan. As Son of Sam ramps up his more

Reviewed by Beth on
March 31, 2016 | 0 comments
A review of This Raging Light by Estelle Laure

With a dad in jail and her mom AWOL, Lucille Bennett’s problems are as followed: she’s left with taking care of the house and raising her adoring little sister, Wren. Fearful of social workers that may split the sisters apart, Lucille covers for her mother’s disappearance by dodging questions by curious neighbors. She’s also forced to get a job to pay the bills, all while trying to scrape by her last year of high school. To make matters worse, she’s nearly-irrationally in love with her best more

Reviewed by Janice - Meadowridge on
March 11, 2016 | 0 comments
A review of Simon Vs. the Homo Sapien's Agenda by Becky Albertalli

Sixteen-year-old Simon knows he'll eventually come out to his family and friends, but for now he's happy to live a drama-free life, keeping the private business of his sexual orientation between himself and Blue, the anonymous but increasingly flirtatious boy he's been chatting with online. This plan is blown to pieces when the wrong pair of eyes falls on an email he wrote to Blue, throwing Simon into the exact swarm of high school politics that he's been so careful to avoid. Simon must decide more

Reviewed by Beth on
January 22, 2016 | 0 comments
A review of Bone Gap by Laura Ruby

Nobody believed that the beautiful and mysterious Roza was going to stay in the sleepy town of Bone Gap for long,  so no one was surprised when she disappeared as quickly as she arrived. Finn O'Sullivan was the last person to see her, and while his love-struck older brother will never forgive him letting Roza leave, Finn knows that she didn't leave willingly. She was taken. Snatched. By a terrifying man whose face Finn can't remember. The more he tries to hold onto his memories, the more

Reviewed by Beth on
January 13, 2016 | 0 comments
A review of ALA Youth Media Awards The American Library Association (ALA) announced the top books, video and audio books for children and young adults, including the Caldecott, Coretta Scott King, Newbery and Printz awards at its Midwinter Meeting and Exibits in Boston on Monday.   A list of 2016 award winners follows: John Newbery Medal for most outstanding contribution to children’s literature - Last Stop on Market Street written by Matt de la more

Reviewed by Molly - Central on
January 12, 2016 | 0 comments
A review of The rest of us just live here by Patrick Ness

Typical themes in young adult fiction - zombies, vampires, teens “beautifully dying of cancer,” and alien invasion - are all fair game for raucously being pulled apart and made fun of in this novel. Narrator Mikey distinguishes his group of friends from the “indie kids,” attractive young people with cool haircuts and vintage clothing who always seem to be the heroes of stories, exemplifying great bravery and courage just in time to save the world. But what about everyone else? Everyone else more

Reviewed by Janice - Meadowridge on
December 18, 2015 | 1 comment
A review of All American Boys by Jason Reynolds

“Rashad is absent again today.” This is the line that will stick with you, in your mind and in your gut, after reading All American Boys by Jason Reynolds and Brendan Kiely. The story is told from two perspectives: Rashad and Quinn. Both high school boys, one Black and one White. The first chapter, in which Rashad is assaulted by a police officer, is explicit and powerful. We see and feel what happened. Quinn sees it too, and the novel takes us through the following week as the boys, more

Reviewed by Kelly - Meadowridge on
December 9, 2015 | 0 comments
A review of Princess Decomposia and Count Spatula by Andi Watson

Are you looking for a gentle scare? This is a darling book full of zombies and werewolves and inhabitants of the netherworld. The cupcake eating vampire and bat-shaped pig-tails on the cover assure the reader of this!  We are first introduced to Princess Decomposia, an overworked, neglected Princess quietly and competently overseeing the Underground Kingdom while her paranoid and hypochondriac bedbound father, the King, harasses all of his staff. The King refuses to eat anything but broth more

Reviewed by Molly - Central on
December 7, 2015 | 0 comments
A review of Need by Joelle Charbonneau

Looking to extend your Wisconsin Book Festival experience? Look no further than the Sequoya Library on Tuesday November 17 at 6:30pm, where we'll be hosting YA author Joelle Charbonneau, author of the acclaimed Testing Triology, and brand new teen thriller, Need. Kaylee needs something, and the whole school knows what it is. Her single-minded obsession with finding more

Reviewed by Beth on
November 11, 2015 | 0 comments