MADreads for Teens

A review of Bee and Puppycat. Volume 1 by Natasha Allegri

This graphic novel is a collection of the first four Bee and Puppycat comic books created by Natashi Allegri. The comics are based on a Cartoon Hangover animated series on YouTube. Each episode is a little over 6 minutes long and it's all adorable, adorable, adorable. If you are not familiar with kawaii - this is it. It's the phenomenon of cuteness in Japanese culture and Bee and Puppycat ...read more

Reviewed by Molly - Central on
June 30, 2015 | 0 comments
A review of Exploring Calvin and Hobbes: An Exhibition Catalogue by Bill Watterson

Ahhh, this brought back a lot of good memories. I still miss this as a daily cartoon; really nothing else since has grabbed me the same way and it has been interesting, working in a library, to see the "gospel" of Calvin being passed on from parents to children. It was quite interesting to read the interview with Bill Watterson, both to learn of how the concept was discovered, how he worked on it, and ultimately why he decided to stop. Also interesting was his take on the current state of ...read more

Reviewed by Liz - Sequoya on
June 24, 2015 | 0 comments
A review of Seraphina by Rachel Hartman

Humans and Dragons have lived together for years with a tenuous truce between them. Yet factions of both humankind and dragonkind are trying to spark a war. Seraphina lives in the palace, daughter of a diplomat, and child of both a human and a dragon. She hides her scales and tries not to call attention to herself, all while working to find a role in the Royal court that would preclude marriage and discovery.I'm a big fan of intrigue, so I liked the Royal intrigue that gets set into play in ...read more

Reviewed by Karen on
June 19, 2015 | 0 comments
A review of Sleeping Freshmen Never Lie by David Lubar

This year’s Teen’s Choice Awards program has gotten off to a busy start. Already there are four votes cast on the Teen’s Choice blog.  Sleeping Freshmen is one of this year’s review books.  At first, Scott is that kid who just wants to get through the day without getting smacked in the back of the head on the bus, without being targeted by older kids for his money, without looking like too much of a nerd to his crush, Julie. Then he sees Julie is involved in various activities and ...read more

Reviewed by Karen on
June 12, 2015 | 0 comments
A review of Roller Girl by Victoria Jamieson

This is an excellent read-alike for fans of Raina Telgemeier and for fans of graphic novels exploring the middle grades. It’s a coming-of-age story about a 12-yr-old girl named Astrid who is lost and drifting away from the best friend she’s had since first grade. Astrid signs up for roller derby camp and is broken-hearted to discover that her best friend, Nicole, won’t be joining her. Nicole has signed up for dance ...read more

Reviewed by Molly - Central on
May 28, 2015 | 0 comments
A review of Marie Antoinette, Serial Killer by Katie Alender

As a huge fan of historical fiction and someone who also appreciates a good horror flick, I'd be lying if I said the title of Marie Antoinette, Serial Killer by Katie Alender wasn't the deal-maker when it came time to choose a new read. I assumed the novel might take place around the French Revolution; however, it's actually a modern-day tale. Our narrator, Colette, is your typical teenage girl attending a private school in Ohio on scholarship: balancing complicated family ...read more

Reviewed by Janice - Meadowridge on
March 27, 2015 | 0 comments
A review of In Real Life by Cory Doctorow

This is a sensitive graphic novel about the implications of online economics specifically related to gaming. Many of the massively-multiplayer online role playing games (MMORPGs) like World of Warcraft and Minecraft incorporate resource mining. This can be for anything from gems to tools to people. The main character of this book, Anda, plays a game called Coarsegold Online and discovers that one of her gamer friends is illegally mining gold. This changes the way Anda plays and her overall ...read more

Reviewed by Molly - Central on
March 9, 2015 | 0 comments
A review of Open Mic: Riffs on Life Between Cultures in Ten Voices by Mitali Perkins

Reviewed by Ali Khan of The Simpson Street Free Press When confronting problems regarding race and ethnicity, many attempt to challenge stereotypes with protests, heated discussions, and even aggression. While these options may be effective, Open Mic: Riffs on Life Between Cultures in Ten Voices, edited by Mitali Perkins, uses a different tactic against racial prejudices—humor.Open Mic is not the average teen novel. Rather than share the perspective of just one author, it ...read more

Reviewed by Jesse on
February 24, 2015 | 1 comment
A review of The Crossover by Kwame Alexander

The Crossover* written by Kwame Alexander is the 2015 Newbery Medal winner. Josh and Jordan Bell are twins, and at 12 years old they've already tasted greatness. Both superstars on their middle school basketball team, the boys live in the warm glow of each other's friendship, and encouragement from their parents-- especially their ex-pro ball player father. When Jordan falls for a girl at school who is no slouch on ...read more

Reviewed by Beth on
February 6, 2015 | 0 comments
A review of I'll Give You the Sun by Jandy Nelson

The American Library Association (ALA) announced the top books, video and audio books for children and young adults today and I'll Give You the Sun by Jandy Nelson was named the 2015 Printz Award Winner. This book is Clark Gable. That is to say, it's super cool. Beyond charismatic. And somewhat tortured. ...read more

Reviewed by Molly - Central on
February 2, 2015 | 0 comments