MADreads

A review of Living with a Wild God: A Nonbeliever's Search for the Truth about Everything by Barbara Ehrenreich

Though she’s been an out and proud atheist for many years, Barbara Ehrenreich, the rationalist, feminist, trained as a scientist, social critic, and writer, has actually been a secret seeker all along. While going through her papers in midlife, and coinciding with a cancer diagnosis, she discovered her girlhood journal, and in it a challenge to her future self: What have you learned since you wrote this? This book is the answer. Her parents and grandparents were fervent atheists, so when as a ...read more

Reviewed by Amy - Lakeview on
June 26, 2014 | 0 comments
A review of The Cute Girl Network by Greg Means

Jack and Jane meet cute when Jane falls off her skateboard and hurts her coccyx. Jack works at a soup stand near where Jane falls and offers her a cold bottle of ice tea to soothe her injury. Awwww! Isn't that sweet?  Their romance starts off with some nice dates and Jack and Jane seem destined for awesome couple hood. That is, until one of Jane's friends sees Jack and Jane together and fills her in on the Network - a text/cell/web chain of single women in the Portland-like city where the ...read more

Reviewed by Molly - Central on
June 24, 2014 | 0 comments
A review of The Heir Apparent: A Life of Edward VII, The Playboy Prince by Jane Ridley

Historian Jane Ridley’s new revisionist account of King Edward VII’s life and reign has a very distinct shift in tone, right as the former Albert Edward, Prince of Wales ascends to the British throne as Edward VII.  For his entire life, Edward (more familiarly known as Bertie) had lived in the shadow, perhaps understandably, of his mother Queen Victoria.  A career of doing mostly nothing had led the prince into the usual pitfalls that accompany wealth and status, bringing most ...read more

Reviewed by Katie H. on
June 23, 2014 | 0 comments
A review of Friends by Mies van Hout

It never ceases to amaze me -- what picture book authors and illustrators can do with just a few simple words and pictures. In Friends, by Mies van Hout, bright and engaging chalk illustrations with one word depict the many joys and hardships of friendship. From playing together, to crying together, and even teasing each other, little creatures perfectly embody a child's experiences being a friend. ...read more

Reviewed by Krissy on
June 20, 2014 | 0 comments
A review of Let’s Talk about Love: Why Other People Have Such Bad Taste by Carl Wilson

Celine Dion is an international superstar. Many music listeners are devoted fans of her powerhouse ballads, while others display intense hatred toward her overemotional warbling. Music critic Carl Wilson, finding himself in the “dislike” column of all things Celine, decided to approach her music with an open mind. The resulting book, Let’s Talk about Love, considers the social and cultural influences that make up Dion’s music, persona, and fanbase within the context of her 1997 album, ...read more

Reviewed by Laura S on
June 19, 2014 | 0 comments
A review of Jinx. Little Jinx Grows Up. by J. Torres

Reading Archie Comics was a huge part of my childhood summers and I'm still a loyal fan. What a delight it was for me to discover that the Archie character Li'l Jinx was being reintroduced as a modern-day high school student! Jinx was a precocious kid introduced in 1947 with a red dress, yellow pigtails, a love for Little League and an ever-present dad. Now a teen, Jinx wears a red shirt, ...read more

Reviewed by Molly - Central on
June 18, 2014 | 0 comments
Donna Tartt's Titles A Donna Tartt book is not an impulse-pick; you really have to commit and see it all the way through.  Her novels are long and dense and dark.  But they are also fantastic. Tartt has a way of plunging you completely, hopelessly, into the worlds she constructs.  I just finished the third Tartt novel,  ...read more

Reviewed by Carra on
June 17, 2014 | 0 comments
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A review of Open Net: The Professional Amateur in the World of Big-Time Hockey by George Plimpton

The late great journalist George Plimpton was well-known for his antics taking on various high (or low) profile occupations, usually to the detriment of his physical self, and the delight of his readers. Along with stints as a professional golfer (The Bogey Man), would-be trapeze artist or his most famous role as a third string quarterback for the Detroit Lions (Paper Lion ...read more

Reviewed by Katie H. on
June 16, 2014 | 0 comments
A review of Open This Little Book by Jesse Klausmeier

If you and your little ones love books, Open This Little Book is the perfect choice. It's a story within a story, a book within a book -- and it's all a lot of fun! Madison native, Jesse Klausmeier, along with illustrator-extraordinaire Suzy Lee, have created an imaginative and exciting picture book that will have your kids asking to read it again and again (really -- my three year old had to read it four times in a row the first day we brought it home from the library). But what's ...read more

Reviewed by Krissy on
June 13, 2014 | 0 comments
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Summer Reading Club The Library's Summer Reading Club has been going for a little more then a week and we've already had 134 books logged online. What makes SRC so great is that the whole family can participate. And you can do so in person by filling out a registration card at your local library or online as these readers are.  Here's a sampling of what's already ...read more

Reviewed by Jane J - Central on
June 12, 2014 | 0 comments
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