Sweet Anticipation for July 2017

Book cover
New Titles

Now that the kids are out of school and vacations either underway or planned, it’s time, once again, to turn our attention to the most pressing question of the season: what sort of new and interesting titles will grace library shelves next month? Happily, there are many to choose from. July brings with it a number of anticipated debuts. Rachel Khong’s Goodbye Vitamin has been getting buzz all year; a story of a young woman at a crossroads as she cares for a father suffering from Alzheimer’s promises humor mixed with empathy. Bianca Marais’ debut Hum If You Don’t Know the Words takes place in 1970s Soweto, with that nation’s struggles with apartheid seen through the eyes of a young girl. Debut novelist Fred Van Lente channels Agatha Christie by putting a diverse and fractious group of comedians on a small island with fatal results in Ten Dead Comedians. And bestselling novelist Michael Connelly has a debut of sorts: The Late Show will be the first in a new series featuring Detective Renee Ballard of the Hollywood station, familiar ground to fans of Connelly’s Harry Bosch series. 

Al Gore’s timely An Inconvenient Sequel heads the nonfiction offerings this month. Fans of popular science can look forward to Sean Kean’s latest with Caesar’s Last Breath: Decoding the Secrets of the Air Around Us and Ben Mezrich’s Woolly: The True Story of the De-Extinction of One of History’s Most Iconic Creatures. Novelist Lisa Scottoline and her daughter Francesca Serritella add to their oeuvre of humorous memoirs with I Need a Lifeguard Everywhere But the Pool. There are these and lots more hot titles for July listed on our Sweet Anticipation PDF, so click on through to get the full list. Happy reading!

Comments

Post new comment

The content of this field is kept private and will not be shown publicly.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd>
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.