MADreads

A review of The Magpie Murders by Anthony Horowitz

There’s been a bit of buzz among book people about Anthony Horowitz’s new novel The Magpie Murders, leading to it being named the top pick for June’s Library Reads and sparking a bit of a ‘dibs’ war when an advanced readers’ copy landed in the library office. It’s no wonder: Horowitz’s novel has been billed as an homage to the golden age of the British mystery, and a compelling novel-within-a-novel in its own right. There’s some catty commentary ...read more

Reviewed by Katie H. on
May 24, 2017 | 0 comments
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New Titles After the frenzy of new titles that marked May, publishers are taking it a bit easy in June. Still, there are enough new and notables to satisfy (most) readers. Thriller readers always get a lot to choose from, and June will see that to-be-read pile grow even more. Fiona Barton returns after last year’s successful debut The Widow with The Child; look for this suspense tale centered on the discovery of a long-buried child’s skeleton to hit shelves at the end of ...read more

Reviewed by Katie H. on
May 16, 2017 | 0 comments
A review of Margaret the First by Danielle Dutton

“As Ambitious as ever any of my Sex was, is, or can be; which makes, that though I cannot be Henry the Fifth, or Charles the Second, yet I endeavor to be Margaret the First.”  So wrote Margaret Cavendish, Duchess of Newcastle, in the preface of her Observations Upon Experimental Philosophy and The Description of a New World, Called the Blazing World. In Danielle Dutton’s brief and sympathetic novel Margaret the First, the comparison to kings is ...read more

Reviewed by Katie H. on
May 11, 2017 | 0 comments
A review of The Hemingway Thief by Shaun Harris

There are few literary mysteries as elusive as the loss of a valise containing all of Ernest Hemingway’s early manuscripts, stolen from a Paris train in 1922 and never seen again. The fate of the manuscripts, coupled with Hemingway’s larger than life persona, has proven irresistible to writers since. Wisconsin-based author Shaun Harris takes on the tale in his assured debut novel The Hemingway Thief, a caper with enough odd characters and close shaves to rival any tale that ...read more

Reviewed by Katie H. on
May 2, 2017 | 0 comments
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New Titles It’s Christmas in May for book lovers, as publishers tend to release their more hyped titles in readiness for the summer vacations (and extra reading time). The biggest release by far is Paula Hawkins’s Into the Water. Hawkins’s thriller The Girl on the Train dominated bestseller lists in 2015, so publishers are betting big with a projected print run of 1.5 million copies. It hits shelves May 2. A somewhat surprising release comes from Michael Crichton, whose ...read more

Reviewed by Katie H. on
April 13, 2017 | 0 comments
A review of Six Four by Hideo Yokoyama

Four-hundred odd pages into Six Four, I was all set to write up this review as a pan. Thank god I kept reading, because Six Four is constructed with the sort of attention to detail that rewards the diligent reader. Hideo Yokoyama’s police procedural, his sixth published novel and the first to make it into English, is a 566 page accounting of the inner turmoil of Prefecture D’s constabulary, an outfit still reeling from failing to solve Japan’s most notorious kidnapping ...read more

Reviewed by Katie H. on
April 10, 2017 | 0 comments
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New Titles April will soon be here, and with it comes a nice flowering of anticipated titles. Thriller fans and mystery fans always have a generous pick of hot titles and April is no different. This month brings new works from favorites Sarah Paretsky, John Sandford, Lisa Scottoline and Jeffrey Deaver, as well as new whodunits from Anne Cleeve, Ann Ross and Susan Albert Wittig. Fans of literary fiction will see the return of Pulitzer-winning Elizabeth Strout with Anything Is Possible, a ...read more

Reviewed by Katie H. on
March 21, 2017 | 0 comments
A review of Conclave by Robert Harris

The Pope is dead. The world's largest religion is lacking a shepherd in a most tumultuous time and the Church needs a steady hand to unite its various factions. It's the responsibility of Jacopo Lomeli to gather the cardinals of the Church into the conclave that will make this momentous decision, sealed away from the world in the Sistine Chapel until one of their brothers emerges as God's chosen. It's the most secretive of elections, a decision guided by the Holy Spirit that results in real ...read more

Reviewed by Katie H. on
March 1, 2017 | 0 comments
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New Titles We've got a double dose of Sweet Anticipation this month since we got behind over the holidays. So here are your March titles to anticipate. March will be a busy month for science fiction and fantasy fans. Popular authors John Scalzi, Anne Bishop, Patricia Briggs, Kim Stanley Robinson AND Samantha Shannon all have new works on the way. Robinson’s novel reimagines a New York City where global has turned the streets into canals, while Scalzi’s delves even deeper into the future and humanity’s ...read more

Reviewed by Katie H. on
February 15, 2017 | 0 comments
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New Titles This February is proving especially sweet as titles from some big name authors make their appearance. Last year’s Pulitzer Prize winner Viet Thanh Nguyen presents his story collection The Refugees, while book club favorite Christina Baker Kline bases her novel A Piece of the World on Andrew Wyeth’s famous work Christina’s World. George Saunders, best known for his story collections, releases his first full length novel Lincoln in the Bardo mid-month. Neil ...read more

Reviewed by Katie H. on
February 14, 2017 | 0 comments