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New Titles September saw the start of the fall publishing season, and October sees the industry hitting its stride. The theme this month is big:  big names, big print runs and big hype. For readers, it’s a bounty of options across genres and ages. So make room on your holds lists, set aside some reading time, and prepare to settle down with your pumpkin spice latte, because there’s bound to be something for everyone this month.  --Although it feels like just yesterday that John Grisham and ...read more

Reviewed by Katie H. on
September 18, 2017 | 0 comments
A review of Duchess Deal by Tessa Dare

The Duke of Ashbury needs a wife—any wife, really. Terribly disfigured on the battlefield, the once handsome duke has retreated to his own solitude and never appears in the light of day. But he needs an heir, and the prospect of venturing into London’s brutal social scene with a face that makes children weep doesn’t appeal. So when seamstress Emma Gladstone shows up on his doorstep one evening—in a wedding dress, no less—he does the logical thing and immediately proposes marriage. Emma is no ...read more

Reviewed by Katie H. on
September 12, 2017 | 0 comments
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New Titles You know, dear readers, that when you’re excited for the titles the didn’t fit on the anticipated titles list as well as those that did, it’s going to be a good month for reading. September sees the start of the big fall publishing season, when publishers release their heavyweight titles in anticipation of the holiday and award seasons. This September is no exception. Here are some highlights: --It may be hard to believe, but it’s been almost a year since the presidential election. ...read more

Reviewed by Katie H. on
August 14, 2017 | 0 comments
A review of Stay with Me by Ayobami Adebayo

As they start their marriage, Yejide and Akin are aware they’ve a lot to learn, but there is one thing they are sure of: theirs will be a monogamous marriage. In late 1980s Nigeria, it is still assumed that Akin will take several wives. The pair, who met at university and have thus far weathered Nigeria’s often volatile political and social climate, have the sort of love that is strong enough to withstand any outsider’s attempts to drive them apart. But Akin and Yejide may be their own greatest ...read more

Reviewed by Katie H. on
August 7, 2017 | 0 comments
A review of Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI by David Grann

In some ways, it’s hard to believe that the events David Grann recounts in Killers of the Flower Moon could qualify as nonfiction. There are outlaws, a self-defined ‘king’, incredible wealth, betrayal of the deepest sort and characters straight out of Central Casting. Yet, knowing this nation’s history of its treatment of Native Americans, the murders that took place in 1920s Osage County, Oklahoma, and their aftermath are all too believable. Grann’s account of the cold-blooded killing ...read more

Reviewed by Katie H. on
July 24, 2017 | 0 comments
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New Titles for August Dear sweet readers, with the waning of summer comes the waning of big summer titles. But fear not, as there are still a few big names coming to library shelves to tide you into the Labor Day weekend. If you’re not into waiting for that big blockbuster to arrive, check out some of the debut authors taking their bow this month. Here’s an abbreviated run-down of August’s new and notables: Mystery readers have an embarrassment of riches this August, as two of the genre’s biggest names release new ...read more

Reviewed by Katie H. on
July 18, 2017 | 0 comments
A review of A Rising Man by Abir Mukherjee

By the time Sam Wyndham washes ashore in Calcutta, he’s a damaged man. Reeling from the loss of his wife to influenza, nursing a opioid addiction and faith in the British Empire severely bruised by what he witnessed in the French trenches, he comes to Calcutta in 1919 in an attempt to start afresh—or maybe escape into oblivion, he hasn’t decided which. In A Rising Man, Abir Mukherjee’s first in a series centered on Wyndham, if the former soldier was wishing to get out of the frying pan ...read more

Reviewed by Katie H. on
July 3, 2017 | 0 comments
A review of Oslo by J. T. Rogers

One of the watershed moments in Middle East history came in September 1993, when Yitzhak Rabin and Yasir Arafat grasped each other’s hands before a beaming President Clinton after signing the Declaration of Principles on Interim Self-Government Arrangements. The agreement, better known as the Oslo Accords, demonstrated that what was deemed impossible—the possibility of Israeli and Palestinian leaders to meet and agree on a peace ...read more

Reviewed by Katie H. on
June 29, 2017 | 0 comments
A review of American Fire: Love, Arson, and Life in a Vanishing Land by Monica Hesse

Accomack County, Virginia, posed on a spit of land bounded by the Atlantic to the east and Chesapeake Bay to the west, is an easily overlooked spot; even some native Virginians might be hard pressed to find it on a map. Forgotten on the map, it’s almost forgotten in reality. Once a thriving agricultural community and tourist destination that made it the richest rural county in the nation, the decline of both industries in Virginia left Accomack’s population dwindling, and a lot of houses ...read more

Reviewed by Katie H. on
June 21, 2017 | 0 comments
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New Titles Now that the kids are out of school and vacations either underway or planned, it’s time, once again, to turn our attention to the most pressing question of the season: what sort of new and interesting titles will grace library shelves next month? Happily, there are many to choose from. July brings with it a number of anticipated debuts. Rachel Khong’s Goodbye Vitamin has been getting buzz all year; a story of a young woman at a crossroads as she cares for a father suffering from ...read more

Reviewed by Katie H. on
June 15, 2017 | 0 comments