MADreads

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New Titles for August Dear sweet readers, with the waning of summer comes the waning of big summer titles. But fear not, as there are still a few big names coming to library shelves to tide you into the Labor Day weekend. If you’re not into waiting for that big blockbuster to arrive, check out some of the debut authors taking their bow this month. Here’s an abbreviated run-down of August’s new and notables: Mystery readers have an embarrassment of riches this August, as two of the genre’s biggest names release new ...read more

Reviewed by Katie H. on
July 18, 2017 | 0 comments
A review of A Rising Man by Abir Mukherjee

By the time Sam Wyndham washes ashore in Calcutta, he’s a damaged man. Reeling from the loss of his wife to influenza, nursing a opioid addiction and faith in the British Empire severely bruised by what he witnessed in the French trenches, he comes to Calcutta in 1919 in an attempt to start afresh—or maybe escape into oblivion, he hasn’t decided which. In A Rising Man, Abir Mukherjee’s first in a series centered on Wyndham, if the former soldier was wishing to get out of the frying pan ...read more

Reviewed by Katie H. on
July 3, 2017 | 0 comments
A review of Oslo by J. T. Rogers

One of the watershed moments in Middle East history came in September 1993, when Yitzhak Rabin and Yasir Arafat grasped each other’s hands before a beaming President Clinton after signing the Declaration of Principles on Interim Self-Government Arrangements. The agreement, better known as the Oslo Accords, demonstrated that what was deemed impossible—the possibility of Israeli and Palestinian leaders to meet and agree on a peace ...read more

Reviewed by Katie H. on
June 29, 2017 | 0 comments
A review of American Fire: Love, Arson, and Life in a Vanishing Land by Monica Hesse

Accomack County, Virginia, posed on a spit of land bounded by the Atlantic to the east and Chesapeake Bay to the west, is an easily overlooked spot; even some native Virginians might be hard pressed to find it on a map. Forgotten on the map, it’s almost forgotten in reality. Once a thriving agricultural community and tourist destination that made it the richest rural county in the nation, the decline of both industries in Virginia left Accomack’s population dwindling, and a lot of houses ...read more

Reviewed by Katie H. on
June 21, 2017 | 0 comments
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New Titles Now that the kids are out of school and vacations either underway or planned, it’s time, once again, to turn our attention to the most pressing question of the season: what sort of new and interesting titles will grace library shelves next month? Happily, there are many to choose from. July brings with it a number of anticipated debuts. Rachel Khong’s Goodbye Vitamin has been getting buzz all year; a story of a young woman at a crossroads as she cares for a father suffering from ...read more

Reviewed by Katie H. on
June 15, 2017 | 0 comments
A review of The Magpie Murders by Anthony Horowitz

There’s been a bit of buzz among book people about Anthony Horowitz’s new novel The Magpie Murders, leading to it being named the top pick for June’s Library Reads and sparking a bit of a ‘dibs’ war when an advanced readers’ copy landed in the library office. It’s no wonder: Horowitz’s novel has been billed as an homage to the golden age of the British mystery, and a compelling novel-within-a-novel in its own right. There’s some catty commentary ...read more

Reviewed by Katie H. on
May 24, 2017 | 0 comments
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New Titles After the frenzy of new titles that marked May, publishers are taking it a bit easy in June. Still, there are enough new and notables to satisfy (most) readers. Thriller readers always get a lot to choose from, and June will see that to-be-read pile grow even more. Fiona Barton returns after last year’s successful debut The Widow with The Child; look for this suspense tale centered on the discovery of a long-buried child’s skeleton to hit shelves at the end of ...read more

Reviewed by Katie H. on
May 16, 2017 | 0 comments
A review of Margaret the First by Danielle Dutton

“As Ambitious as ever any of my Sex was, is, or can be; which makes, that though I cannot be Henry the Fifth, or Charles the Second, yet I endeavor to be Margaret the First.”  So wrote Margaret Cavendish, Duchess of Newcastle, in the preface of her Observations Upon Experimental Philosophy and The Description of a New World, Called the Blazing World. In Danielle Dutton’s brief and sympathetic novel Margaret the First, the comparison to kings is ...read more

Reviewed by Katie H. on
May 11, 2017 | 0 comments
A review of The Hemingway Thief by Shaun Harris

There are few literary mysteries as elusive as the loss of a valise containing all of Ernest Hemingway’s early manuscripts, stolen from a Paris train in 1922 and never seen again. The fate of the manuscripts, coupled with Hemingway’s larger than life persona, has proven irresistible to writers since. Wisconsin-based author Shaun Harris takes on the tale in his assured debut novel The Hemingway Thief, a caper with enough odd characters and close shaves to rival any tale that ...read more

Reviewed by Katie H. on
May 2, 2017 | 0 comments
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New Titles It’s Christmas in May for book lovers, as publishers tend to release their more hyped titles in readiness for the summer vacations (and extra reading time). The biggest release by far is Paula Hawkins’s Into the Water. Hawkins’s thriller The Girl on the Train dominated bestseller lists in 2015, so publishers are betting big with a projected print run of 1.5 million copies. It hits shelves May 2. A somewhat surprising release comes from Michael Crichton, whose ...read more

Reviewed by Katie H. on
April 13, 2017 | 0 comments