A review of You Will Know Me by Megan Abbott

There’s a tendency by sports commentators to assume all sorts of girl drama within the ultra-competitive world of elite gymnastics. Whether it’s true or not, it’s irresistible to ascribe all sorts of highs and lows as teen and pre-teen girls put their bodies and minds through the punishing training required for the sport. For author Megan Abbott, the intensity of the gymnastics world is a perfect fit for her particular brand of thriller that delves into the darkest corners of the teenage female more

Reviewed by Katie H. on
October 27, 2016 | 0 comments
A review of Jack 1939 by Francine Mathews

The first thing I read by Francine Mathews was Death in the Off-Season which introduced Nantucket police officer Merry Folger. I loved the book. Merry was a great protagonist and the setitng of Nantucket, which veers between being a sleepy small town in the winter to a major tourist destination in more

Reviewed by Jane J on
October 25, 2016 | 0 comments
A review of Mad Enchantment: Claude Monet and the Painting of the Water Lilies by Ross King

George Clemenceau was facing a huge problem. The man who had seen France through the final phases of World War I, the so called ‘Tigre’ of French politics still going strong into his eighties, was at his wits end thanks to his long standing friendship with Claude Monet. The former prime minister had long been negotiating with Monet to have his last work, a vast ‘Grand Decoration,’ donated to the state to be enshrined in a museum modified to the artist’s specifications set to open in the spring more

Reviewed by Katie H. on
October 24, 2016 | 0 comments
A review of Whoosh! : Lonnie Johnson's super-soaking stream of inventions by Chris Barton

If you imagine that whomever invented the Super-Soaker was hardly a rocket scientist, you would be flat-out wrong! Lonnie Johnson was exactly that, inventing rockets, rocket fuel, robots that actually moved via commands from sister’s walkie-talkie in his childhood. Johnson became a NASA engineer, and then went on to full-time inventing. Woosh! is a look into the life of the man behind the popular toy – his triumphs and his challenges, including racist policies and attitudes that threatened to more

Reviewed by Karen on
October 21, 2016 | 0 comments
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Wisconsin Book Festival Wisconsin Public Radio is a media sponsor of the Wisconsin Book Festival, occurring October 20-23. It's going to be a busy weekend with lots to see and do, so, if you need a little help, check out these authors and presenters who have been interviewed on Wisconsin Public Radio:  Oct 20 at 7:30pm at the Central Library Community RoomJane Hamilton, author of more

Reviewed by Marcus - Central on
October 20, 2016 | 0 comments
A review of The Orchard by Theresa Weir

I've enjoyed just about every novel Theresa Weir has written (both as herself and as Anne Frasier) so I was curious to read her memoir of life on an Iowa apple farm. That I liked the book isn't a shocker. And the fact that the book is darker in tone then the cover suggests was also to be expected more

Reviewed by Jane J on
October 19, 2016 | 0 comments
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Wisconsin Book Festival In conjunction with the Year of Shakespeare in Wisconsin and funded in part by UW-Madison Libraries and Friends of UW-Madison Libraries, the 2016 Wisconsin Book Festival will host a dynamic group of authors who have written Shakepeare inspired works. In anticipation of the First more

Reviewed by Liz B on
October 18, 2016 | 0 comments
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New Titles November always marks a time when publishers try to get some of their top authors out in time for the holidays and this year is no different.  Perennial top sellers like Lee Child, David Baldacci and Anne Rice are adding to their respective series. A couple of highly anticipated literary novels hit the shelves this month: Pulitzer-winner Michael Chabon presents an epic in Moonglow and Zadie Smith publishes her fifth, Swing Time, mid-month. Fans of TV’s The Daily Show more

Reviewed by Katie H. on
October 17, 2016 | 0 comments
A review of Twenty Yawns by Jane Smiley

Lucy and her family spend a day at the beach, digging in the sand, walking on the beach, and playing together. Then they head home where Lucy's mom begins a bedtime story, but falls asleep, tired from their day. Lucy wakes up, wanting her bedtime bear and stuffed animals. This great picture book is filled with expressive narration and evocative illustrations, from Pulitzer Prize winner more

Reviewed by Tina - Central on
October 14, 2016 | 0 comments
A review of The Hating Game by Sally Thorne

Lucy really hates Joshua—and he feels exactly the same. The two serve as administrative assistants for respective CEOs of a publishing firm forced into a merger of two very different, very struggling houses.  Lucy is short and sweet, always ‘the nice one’ among her fellow employees, working in her dream industry but lonely after hours. Joshua is a numbers man, the one that slashed a third of the workforce after the merger, ever scrupulous in his duties, born without a heart. Stuck in the more

Reviewed by Katie H. on
October 11, 2016 | 0 comments