Business Resources - August 7, 2017

Business Resources
 

Business Resources

Monday, August 7, 2017

 

Thanks for reading our Business Resources newsletter. Every month, we use this opportunity to share resources and events related to investments, entrepreneurship, marketing, productivity, and finance.

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Machine, Platform, Crowd: Harnessing Our Digital Future 
by Andrew McAffee

 

We live in strange times. A machine plays the strategy game Go better than any human; upstarts like Apple and Google destroy industry stalwarts such as Nokia; ideas from the crowd are repeatedly more innovative than corporate research labs. MIT's Andrew McAfee and Erik Brynjolfsson know what it takes to master this digital-powered shift: we must rethink the integration of minds and machines, of products and platforms, and of the core and the crowd.

 

 

 

The One Device: The Secret History of the iPhone 
by Brian Merchant 

 

The secret history of the invention that changed everything- and became the most profitable product in the world. Odds are that as you read this, an iPhone is within reach. But before Steve Jobs introduced us to "the one device," as he called it, a cell phone was merely what you used to make calls on the go. The One Device is a roadmap for design and engineering genius, an anthropology of the modern age, and an unprecedented view into one of the most secretive companies in history.

 

 

 

The Camino Way 
by Victor Prince

 

Stretching across 500 miles of northern Spain, the Camino de Santiago has been a pilgrimage route for a millennium. Each year, hundreds of thousands of peregrinos make their way through rugged countryside and medieval towns in order to reflect, test their will, and join a community of strangers on a shared mission. In short, it's the ideal training ground for authentic leadership.

 

 

 

Finance for Normal People: How Investors and Markets Behave
by Meir Statman

 

Behavioral finance is finance for normal people, like you and me. This book is also about transformation from normal-ignorant to normal-knowledgeable, learning the lessons of behavioral finance and applying them to banish ignorance, gain knowledge, and increase the ratio of smart to stupid behavior on our way to what we want. This book offers behavioral finance as a unified structure that incorporates parts of standard finance, replaces others, and includes bridges between theory, evidence, and practice

 

 

 

The Kelloggs: The Battling Brothers of Battle Creek 
by Howard Markel

 

John Harvey Kellogg was one of America's most beloved physicians; a best-selling author, lecturer, and health-magazine publisher; founder of the Battle Creek Sanitarium; and patron saint of the pursuit of wellness. His youngest brother, Will, was the founder of the Battle Creek Toasted Corn Flake Company, which revolutionized the mass production of food and what we eat for breakfast. Through their ascent into the pantheon of American industrialists, we see the cast changes in American social mores that took shape in diet, health, medicine, philanthropy, and food manufacturing during seven decades.

 

 

 

Lead Right for Your Company’s Type: How to Connect Your Culture with Your Customer Promise
by William E. Schneider 

 

Success starts with knowing the kind of business you're really in. This book argues that every enterprise falls into one of four categories as dictated by their customer promise: customized (e.g. ad agency), predictable and dependable (e.g utility company), benevolent (e.g. educational institution), and best in class (e.g. high-tech company like Apple). When leadership practices fit the customer promise and company type, the organization thrives. But apply the wrong practices and the mismatch pulls the enterprise apart.

 

 

 

Perennial Seller: The Art of Making and Marketing Work that Lasts 
by Ryan Holiday

 

Holiday reveals that the key to success for many perennial sellers is that their creators don't distinguish between the making and the marketing. The product's purpose and audience are in the creator's mind from day one. By thinking holistically about the relationship between their audience and their work, creators of all kinds improve the chances that their offerings will stand the test of time.