Booked for Teens - August 5, 2017

 

Booked for Teens
 
 

Saturday, August 5, 2017

Booked for Teens is a monthly booklist of new and/or great YA titles, and highlists programs and events for teens.  View more Booked for Teens: Blog View | Archived Newsletter View | All insider newsletters

 

August!

August is a long, hot month. The PERFECT time to dig through the backlist, and find some new-to-you YA titles that you might have missed when they were hot off the presses! Here are a few of my favorites, but taking a browse through the YA stacks at any of our locations is a super way to make discoveries AND take advantage of the air conditioning. 

 

Akata Witch
by Nnedi Okorafor

Dubbed the Nigerian Harry Potter, this spectacular book is finally getting a sequel (Akata Warrior, out in October), and what a great excuse to talk about it again! A twelve year old Nigerian girl discovers some latent powers just in time to catch a killer that has been terrorizing her community.

The Basic Eight
Daniel Handler

A Heather's-esq story of popularity, wealth, gossip, absinthe, and MURDER. Darkly humorous and endlessly clever, this story about a clique of popular teenagers turned murderous is an unexpected delight. 

The Dark Days of Hamburger Halpin
by Josh Berk

Will Halpin just transfered out of his school for the deaf, and things aren't going great. In a sweet and self-depricating voice, Will takes the readers through his bumpy adjustment to mainstream public school, until a popular football player (dun dun DUN...) gets murdered. Investigation, and possible friendship and romance ensue!

Grasshopper Jungle
by Andrew Smith

16-year-old Austin just kissed his best friend Robby, and is terrified his girlfriend will find out. He also wants to do it again. If that wasn't confusing enough, he and Robby also accidentally unleased an army of gigantic mutant insects that are about to wipe out mankind. This book is a BONKERS account of the end of the world, told by a confused, sex-crazed, but loveable teenage boy. Raunchy and electric.

Jasper Jones
by Craig Silvey

Charlie is a quiet, bookish boy who keeps to himself. Everything changes when Jasper Jones, an outcast in their small 1970's Australian town, knocks on his bedroom window one night and asks him to help cover up the murder of a girl in their town until they can find the killer-- otherwise Jasper will surely be blamed. A gripping mystery, as well as dark (but warm) coming of age story.

Please Ignore Vera Dietz
by AS King

Vera is just trying to keep her head down, delivering pizzas to save up for community college. But the secrets she is keeping surrounding the recent death of her best friend Charlie are spiraling. Lifelong friends, and both from troubled homes, she and Charlie were starting to fall for each other when everything went wrong. AS King is known for her dark depictions of struggling teenagers, and this 2010 page-turner is no exception. 

Pure
by Julianna Baggott

When the detonations hit, some (priviledged) people made it safely to the domes. Most didn't. A majority of people on earth died, and those that survived fused, painfully, with whatever they were near when it happened. This incredibly imaginative dystopian adventure takes place in a dark and fascinating world, where the young protagonist has plasitc doll head for a hand. A DOLL HEAD FOR A HAND. And that's just the beginning.

Touching Snow
by M. Sindy Felin

Life in the US is a challenge for Karina and her family, who recently emigrated from Haiti, but the real struggle is at home. Karina's stepfather is incredibly violent, and things are getting worse as she and her sisters beging to assimilate. As things escalate, someone makes and anonymous call to social services, and Karina is encouraged by her family to take the fall. A complex examination of how abuse victims survive, and at what cost.

When the Black Girl Sings
by Bil Wright

Being the only black student at a posh private school is hard enough, but now Lahni's white adoptive parents are divorcing. The lonliness and isolation of searching for her identity is getting overwhelming, until she discovers a love (and talent) of gospel music. Beautifully written and incredibly moving.